Mathematics Department News
Toro named Chancellor’s Professor at UC Berkeley
December 2016: Tatiana Toro will spend the spring at UC Berkeley as the Chancellor’s Visiting Professor in Mathematics while participating at the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute in their Harmonic Analysis program. Every year, the programs scheduled at MSRI the following year nominate leading mathematicians in the field to be the Chancellor’s Professor, with the Berkeley Math department selecting one for the position. The Chancellor’s Professor serves as a bridge between graduate students in the department and researchers visiting MSRI. As this year’s Chancellor’s Professor, Tatiana will teach a graduate course on recent developments lying at the interface of harmonic analysis, partial differential equations, and geometric measure theory.
New AMS Fellows
November 2016: Isabella Novik, Julia Pevtsova, and Tatiana Toro are among the sixty-five mathematicians from around the world who have been named Fellows of the American Mathematical Society for 2017. This is the fifth year of the program, which recognizes AMS members who have made outstanding contributions to the creation, exposition, advancement, communication, and utilization of mathematics. Among the goals of the program are to create an enlarged class of mathematicians recognized by their peers as distinguished because of their contributions to the profession, and to honor excellence.
Gunther Uhlmann gives Swedish Academy Lecture
October 2016: The Swedish Academy took a break from awarding Nobel Prizes in October to learn from Gunther Uhlmann about Inverse problems and Harry Potter's cloak. This was part of the Academy Lectures, a series of open lectures covering the most exciting fields of science in which the Academy is active. Gunther spoke about inverse problems and the progress that has been made in achieving invisibility via transformation optics.
Thomas Rothvoss named 2016 Packard Fellow
October 2016: Thomas Rothvoss has been named one of eighteen recipients of a 2016 Packard Fellowship in Science and Engineering by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. The Foundation describes the fellows as among "the nation's most innovative early-career scientists and engineers," and provides generous funding so that they have "the freedom to take risks and explore new frontiers in their fields. ... The revolutionary work of these talented researchers has the ability to profoundly impact the lives of their students and all of us in the world at large."

Thomas is a 2015 recipient of a Sloan Research Fellowship and holds a joint faculty position in UW's Department of Computer Science and Engineering. The Packard citation for his award states that his "research is located in the intersection of mathematics and computer science and deals with the question of which types of computational problems can be solved efficiently by algorithms and which ones cannot. In particular, he develops techniques to find approximate solutions to computationally hard problems." For more information, see the article in UW Today.
Shirshendu Ganguly named Graduate Medalist in Natural Sciences
May 2016: Graduate student Shirshendu Ganguly has been named the recipient of the College of Arts and Sciences Graduate Medal in Natural Sciences. Shirshendu, a student of Christopher Hoffman and Ioana Dumitriu, studies probability and its applications. He already has a long list of collaborators, including several mathematicians at Microsoft Research. After receiving his PhD in June, Shirshendu will go to UC Berkeley as a Miller Fellow.
Krzysztof Burdzy named Carver Medalist
April 2016: Krzysztof (Chris) Burdzy has been named the Institute of Mathematical Statistics' 2016 Carver Medalist. The medal, created by the IMS to honor Harry C. Carver, Founding Editor of the Annals of Mathematical Statistics and one of the founders of the IMS, is for exceptional service to the IMS. Chris's award recognizes his "leadership in the development and curation of electronic publications for the IMS probability community, especially for co-founding the Electronic Journal of Probability and Electronic Communications in Probability, and the Probability Abstract Service, and for sustained vigilance and dedication to ensuring the stability and open access for these publications and for serving as an informed resource for IMS on electronic issues."
Austin Stromme receives Goldwater Scholarship
March 2016: Austin Stromme, a Mathematics and Computer Science double major, has been awarded a Goldwater Scholarship from the Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation. The Goldwater scholarship program is designed to foster and encourage outstanding students to pursue careers in the fields of mathematics, the natural sciences, and engineering. Austin has been working on two research projects: one on generalized electrical networks with Professor Jim Morrow, the other on probabilistic models with finishing graduate student Matt Junge. He plans to continue his studies in mathematics after graduation, pursuing a PhD and then an academic career of teaching and research.
Christopher Hoffman named a 2016 Simons Fellow
March 2016: The Simons Foundation has announced that Christopher Hoffman is one of the 2016 Simons Fellows in Mathematics. The fellowship program, which began in 2012, is designed to provide awardees with additional sabbatical funding that can "lead to increased creativity and productivity in research." Tatiana Toro was one of the inaugural fellows four years ago, followed by Hart Smith, Gunther Uhlmann, and Sándor Kovács in subsequent years.
Bianca Viray awarded an NSF CAREER grant
March 2016: Bianca Viray has been awarded a CAREER grant under the National Science Foundation's Faculty Early Career Development Program. Bianca joined the department in the summer of 2014 after four years at Brown as an NSF postdoctoral fellow and Tamarkin Assistant Professor. She works in number theory and algebraic geometry.
Jarod Alper appointed Associate Professor
March 2016: Jarod Alper will join the department in January 2017 as a tenured associate professor. Jarod, who works in algebraic geometry, received his PhD under Ravi Vakil at Stanford in 2008. He spent three years at Columbia as an NSF postdoctoral fellow and a year at Universidad de Los Andes in Bogota as an assistant professor before moving to Canberra, Australia, to join the faculty of the Australian National University as Lecturer and then Senior Lecturer. At Canberra, he holds an Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Researcher Award. Here at UW, he will join fellow algebraic geometers Sándor Kovács, Max Lieblich, and Bianca Viray.
Ioana Dumitriu and Julia Pevtsova promoted to Professor
March 2016: Ioana Dumitriu and Julia Pevtsova have been approved for promotion from associate professor to professor, to take effect in September 2016. Ioana joined the department in 2006, after three years at UC Berkeley as a Miller Research Fellow. Her research is in random matrix theory and numerical analysis. Julia joined the department in a postdoctoral position in 2005, following postdoctoral positions at the University of Oregon and the Institute for Advanced Study. She became a tenure-track assistant professor in 2008. Her research is in algebra and representation theory.
Harry Corson (1931 - 2015)
December 2015: Former faculty member Harry Corson died on December 20, 2015, after a long struggle with Parkinson's disease. He was born in Nashville, Tennessee, and studied physics as an undergraduate and Master's student at Vanderbilt University. Harry went on to earn his PhD in mathematics at Duke and taught briefly at Tulane before moving to Seattle to join the faculty at UW, where he remained until his retirement. An obituary for Harry that captures his lively personality can be found at www.legacy.com.
Gunther Uhlmann's cloaking theory successfully realized
October 2015: Recently, researchers at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona successfully constructed a magnetostatic wormhole that cloaks an electromagnetic field, applying the mathematical theory developed by Gunther Uhlmann and his colleagues in a 2007 Physical Review Letters paper. In an interview with UW Today, Ullmann notes, "The experimental side of the problem requires new materials that do not have properties that exist in nature. They have to be artificially created." The researchers in Barcelona were able to construct and design a metamaterial with just the right properties to cloak a specific magnetic field within a sphere, making the field invisible to outside detection.
Dmitriy Drusvyatskiy is a finalist for the 2015 Tucker Prize
July 2015: The Mathematical Optimization Society announced the three finalists for this year's A.W. Tucker Prize for outstanding doctoral thesis at the International Symposium on Mathematical Programming held in Pittsburgh, one finalist being our newest assistant professor, Dima Drusvyatskiy. He is cited for his 2013 thesis, Slope and Geometry in Variational Mathematics, which "distinguishes itself by its scope, developing fundamental concepts in mathematical optimization through a unique blend of semi-algebraic geometry and nonsmooth optimization theory and applying these to semi-algebraic or so-called tame optimization problems. ... Built on rich imagination and creativity, this dissertation makes an inspiring set of fundamental and far reaching conclusions in the area of nonsmooth optimization."
Joshua Kim named A&S Dean's Medalist in Social Sciences
May 2015: Joshua Kim has been named one of the four 2014 recipients of the College of Arts and Sciences' Dean's Medal, presented annually to an outstanding student in each of the College's four divisions. Joshua is a double major in Economics and Mathematics, and will begin graduate studies in economics at Stanford next year. Last January, Joshua presented some joint research at the American Economic Association annual conference in Boston, in the preliminary paper Bankruptcy Rates among NFL Players with Short-Lived Income Spikes.
David Jekel named A&S Dean's Medalist in Natural Sciences
May 2015: David Jekel has been named one of the four 2014 recipients of the College of Arts and Sciences' Dean's Medal, presented annually to an outstanding student in each of the College's four divisions. David is a double major in Mathematics and Classics, and will begin graduate studies in mathematics at UCLA next year. He has been doing research for a senior thesis under the supervision of Professor Tatiana Toro and additional research with Professor Jim Morrow. David is the twelfth math major in the past fourteen years to receive the natural sciences dean's medal.
Kitty Baxter makes estate gift to AMS
April 2015: Kitty Baxter, long-time faculty member and student advisor who retired in 1985 and died in 2012, is featured in the current issue of the American Mathematical Society's newsletter, The Line, in recognition of her generous estate gift to the AMS. Kitty completed her PhD at UC Berkeley in 1959 under Abraham Seidenberg, then moved to Seattle with her husband, Edward Scott O'Keefe, and joined the department. (O'Keefe was a member of a prominent mathematical family, including uncle Griffith Evans, former president of the AMS, long-time chair at Berkeley, and eponym of the department's current home.) Kitty's gift will support mathematical research.
Tatiana Toro awarded Guggenheim Fellowship
April 2015: On April 8, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation announced the recipients of its 2015 Fellowships listing the recipients the next day in a full-page ad in the New York Times. The fellowships are "intended for men and women who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts." Tatiana Toro is one of two mathematicians this year to receive the honor, which will allow her to further her research in geometric measure theory, harmonic analysis, and partial differential equations.
Matt Junge to receive UW Excellence in Teaching Award
April 2015: Matt Junge, who was featured in this space in January for his work at the Washington Correction Center for Women, has been named one of the recipients of the university's Excellence in Teaching Award, to be presented on June 11 at the annual university event honoring all Awards of Excellence recipients. The award is given to two graduate students each year for "demonstration of extraordinary ability in the teaching and learning process as a graduate TA." Matt is the first mathematics graduate student to receive it, in recognition of his extraordinary range of teaching activities both in the department and beyond.
Cris Negron named NSF Postdoctoral Research Fellow
March 2015: Cris Negron has received a Mathematical Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellowship from the National Science Foundation. Already the recipient of a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, Cris has been working on noncommutative algebra and noncommutative algebraic geometry under the supervision of James Zhang. He will continue his research next year at Louisiana State University, and then as a postdoc at MIT.
Thomas Rothvoss receives Sloan Research Fellowship
February 2015: On February 23rd, the Sloan Foundation announced the winners of its 2015 Sloan Research Fellows in a full-page ad in the New York Times. Among the recipients is Thomas Rothvoss, who joined the department in January 2014 as an assistant professor. Thomnas works in discrete optimization, linear/integer programming, and theoretical computer science. As of January 2015, he holds a joint appointment as an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering.
Albert Nijenhuis (1926-2015)
February 2015: Affiliate faculty member Albert Nijenhuis died on Friday, February 13. He was born on November 21, 1926, in Eindhoven, The Netherlands. During World War II, he studied mathematics on his own, continuing his studies afterwards at the University of Amsterdam and receiving his PhD in 1952. Following appointments at Princeton, the Institute for Advanced Study, and the University of Chicago, Albert came to the University of Washington as an assistant professor, staying until 1963, by which time he was a professor. During his years on the faculty, Albert spoke at the International Congress of Mathematicians (1958, Edinburgh) and was a Guggenheim Fellow. In 1963, he moved to the University of Pennsylvania. Upon retirement in 1987, Albert returned to his beloved Seattle and became an affiliate professor in the department, where we were fortunate to benefit from his warm presence for many years.
Alumnus Brian Hopkins receives 2015 Haimo Teaching Award
January 2015: At the Joint Mathematical Meetings in San Antonio earlier this month, Brian Hopkins received the Mathematical Association of America's Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo Award for Distinguished College or University Teaching of Mathematics, the same award that Jim Morrow was given in 2008. Hopkins, a professor at St. Peter's University in Jersey City, New Jersey, obtained his PhD at UW in 1997 under the supervision of Monty McGovern. In the award citation, Brian is described as "a master teacher with a genuine desire to see all of his students succeed, with a knack for posing problems and the ability to create an atmosphere of mutual respect and exploration in his classroom." In responding, Brian listed among his inspirations "John Sullivan (appreciation of historical sources), Virginia Warfield (teaching informed by education research), and James King (well-used technology)." This is Brian's second MAA award. In 2005, he and co-author Robin Wilson shared the George Pólya Award for articles of expository excellence for their paper on Euler's Konigsberg bridge problem.
Matt Junge teaching in women's prison
January 2015: Matt Junge, a graduate student who received the department's Excellence in Teaching award in 2011, is featured in the current newsletter of the Freedom Education Project Puget Sound for a year-long college prep course he is offering at the Washington Correction Center for Women. With the resumption of his class earlier this month, one student declared, "The break was way too long. Can we start the semester earlier next time?" Matt, who studied math and philosophy as an undergraduate at UW, is serving the department this year as Lead TA while continuing his research in probability.
2014-15 Milliman Lectures
January 2015: This year's Milliman Lectures will be given in February by Rick Schoen, Distinguished Professor and the Excellence in Teaching Endowed Chair at UC, Irvine. He will lecture on problems and progress in mathematical relativity, two eigenvalue problems for surfaces, and localizing solutions of the Einstein equations. More details can be found on the department's Milliman webpage.
Department Newsletter
December 2014: This year's newsletter has just appeared. It features an introduction to the research of Professor Isabella Novik, an interview with Professor Emeritus Terry Rockafellar, an article on Dean's Medalist Reid Dale, and memorial pieces on former colleagues Lutz Bungart and Scott Osborne.
New Arrivals
October 2014: The department is proud to introduce two new assistant professors: Dima Drusvyatskiy and Bianca Viray. Dima joins us from the University of Waterloo where he was a postdoctoral fellow after receiving his PhD from Cornell. He works in nonsmooth optimization and variational analysis. Bianca joins us from Brown, where she was an NSF postdoctoral fellow and Tamarkin assistant professor after receiving her PhD at UC, Berkeley. She works in number theory and algebraic geometry.
M. Scott Osborne (1946-2014)
July 2014: Long-time faculty member Scott Osborne died on Friday, July 4. He was born on September 2, 1946, in Rupert, Idaho, and attended the University of Washington, receiving a BS in physics in 1968. Scott continued his studies at Yale, receiving a PhD in mathematics in 1972 under the supervision of Robert Langlands. Next came a one-year visiting assistant professorship at the University of Michigan and two years at the University of Chicago as an L.E. Dickson Instructor.

Scott joined the University of Washington as an assistant professor in 1975, moving on to be an associate professor and professor before retiring in 2012 and becoming professor emeritus. Well known to students for his teaching in a range of core undergraduate and graduate courses, Scott published two textbooks in Springer's Graduate Texts in Mathematics series, Basic Homological Algebra and, just this year, Locally Convex Spaces. His final paper is due to appear in the October issue of the American Mathematical Monthly.
Austin Roberts honored at FPSAC 2014
July 2014: Austin Roberts shared the award for best student paper at the 26th International Conference on Formal Power Series and Algebraic Combinatorics (FPSAC 2014) held at DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois. These awards recognize the depth of the papers' results as well as the clarity of the recipients' presentations.
Sándor Kovács named a 2014 Simons Fellow
June 2014: The Simons Foundation has announced that Sándor Kovács is one of the 2014 Simons Fellows in Mathematics. The fellowship program, which began in 2012, is designed to provide awardees with additional sabbatical funding in order to "increase creativity and provide intellectual stimulation." Tatiana Toro was one of the inaugural fellows two years ago, with Hart Smith and Gunther Uhlmann joining her last year.
We're #4!
June 2014: According to Graduateprograms.com, a graduate program guide based on student surveys, the University of Washington was ranked fourth in a list of top mathematics graduate programs, behind Stanford, Harvard, and Columbia and just ahead of Princeton and MIT. The rankings cover a period from September 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013 based on 15 ranking categories that cover a variety of student topics, such as academic competitiveness, career support, financial aid, and quality of network.
Reid Dale named A&S Dean's Medalist in Natural Sciences
May 2014: Reid Dale has been named one of the four 2014 recipients of the College of Arts and Sciences' Dean's Medal, presented annually to an outstanding student in each of the College's four divisions. He is also the recipient of an NSF graduate fellowship, which he will use to pursue a PhD in mathematics at UC Berkeley. Reid already has a head start, having just visited Berkeley for a semester to pursue several research projects under the supervision of Professor Thomas Scanlon. He is the eleventh math major to receive the Dean's Medal in the past thirteen years.
2014 NSF Postdoctoral Fellows Toby Johnson and Austin Roberts
May 2014: Toby Johnson and Austin Roberts are the latest departmental recipients of Mathematical Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellowships from the National Science Foundation. Johnson has been working in probability and combinatorics under the supervision of Ioana Dumitriu and Soumik Pal. He plans to carry on his research as a postdoc at the University of Southern California. Roberts works in combinatorics and will complete his PhD this year under the supervision of Sara Billey. He will be teaching in the fall at Highline Community College in Des Moines, Washington.
Thomas Rothvoss arrives with a bang
May 2014: Thomas Rothvoss has been awarded the STOC 2014 Best Paper Prize for "The matching polytope has exponential extension complexity," which he will present at the 46th ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing (STOC 2014). This conference is sponsored by the ACM Special Interest Group on Algorithms and Computation Theory and will be held in New York at the beginning of June. Thomas is giving one of two plenary talks, along with the Turing Award lectures by Shafi Goldwasser and Silvio Micali.

Thomas joined our department this past January as our newest assistant professor (with an adjunct appointment in Computer Science and Engineering), after holding postdoctoral positions at MIT and, before that, at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne. His research interests include approximation algorithms, linear and integer programming, combinatorics, network design, and scheduling. No sooner had Thomas arrived than he was heading down to Portland to present his paper "Polynomiality for Bin Packing with a Constant Number of Item Types," written jointly with Michel Goemans, at the ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms in Portland. It too was a prize winner, receiving the SODA 2014 best paper award.
Good Times
April 2014: A CareerCast report on The Best Jobs of 2014 ranks Mathematician first, with the comments that "careers in mathematics are diverse and rewarding" and "the field also has a positive outlook for continued future growth." The Wall Street Journal picked up the story, quoting publisher Tony Lee's view that "math skills unlock a world of career opportunities."

What's second? Tenured university professor. No wonder Padelford is such a happy place.
Matthew Kahle awarded an NSF CAREER grant
April 2014: The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a CAREER grant to former grad student Matthew Kahle. Matt received his PhD from UW in 2007, with Eric Babson and Chris Hoffman as advisors. Following three years at Stanford as an NSF postdoctoral fellow and a year at the Institute for Advanced Study, he became an assistant professor in 2011 at Ohio State University, receiving a Sloan Research Fellowship a year later. Matt's research interests include interactions of topology and geometry with probability, statistical mechanics, and combinatorics.

The NSF awards the prestigious CAREER grants to "junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations."
Gunther Uhlmann honored
March 2014: The Finnish Academy of Science and Letters has elected Gunther Uhlmann to join their society as a Foreign Member. Founded in 1908, the Academy aims to unite and support Finnish-speaking scientists and scholars in Finland, and consists of a fixed number of members representing the sciences and humanities. Foreign members have been appointed since 1924.

Uhlmann has also been invited to give the eighth annual Baylor Lecture Series in Mathematics at Baylor University in October and one of the plenary talks at the triennial International Congress of Mathematical Physics (ICMP) in Santiago, Chile, in 2015.
Tatiana Toro featured in the Simons Foundation 2012 annual report
November 2013: An article highlighting Tatiana Toro's research was recently featured in the 2012 Annual Report from the Simons Foundation. Toro was named a 2012 Simons Fellow in Mathematics for her research on geometric measure theory and its relation to variational problems that yield a partial differential equation and an associated free boundary.
Zhenqing Chen named Fellow of the American Mathematical Society
November 2013: Zhenqing Chen is one of fifty mathematical scientists from around the world to be included in the 2014 class of AMS Fellows. This program, which is now in its second year, recognizes AMS members who have made outstanding contributions to the creation, exposition, advancement, communication, and utilization of mathematics. One goal of the program is to create an enlarged class of mathematicians recognized by their peers as distinguished for their contributions to the profession and to honor excellence.
Gunther Uhlmann gives talk at the Banff Centre
September 2013: While attending and serving as co-organizer of a conference on Geometry and Inverse Problems at the Banff International Research Station (BIRS) this month, Gunther Uhlmann gave a public lecture on Harry Potter's Cloak. The talk, part of the Banff Centre's Leading Ideas Speaker Series, focused on the science behind the invisibility cloak worn by the title character of the Harry Potter novels. An article on the talk also appeared in the Banff Centre blog.
Krzysztof Burdzy receives membership in the Washington State Academy of Sciences (WSAS)
August 2013: Krzysztof Burdzy has been elected as a member of the WSAS, an organization of Washington scientists "dedicated to serving the state with scientific counsel" and formed as a "working academy" on the model of the National Research Council. He will be inducted at the 6th Annual Meeting and Symposium at the Museum of Flight on September 12, 2013.
William Stein awarded 2013 ACM/SIGSAM Jenks Prize
July 2013: The 2013 Richard Dimick Jenks Memorial Prize for Excellence in Software Engineering applied to Computer Algebra was awarded to William Stein for his Sage Project. This prize recognizes outstanding software engineering contributions in the field of computer algebra, and is awarded every two years by the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Symbolic and Algebraic Manipulation at the International Symposium on Symbolic and Algebraic Computation (ISSAC)
UW Math offers online calculus courses
June 2013: Online versions of the calculus courses Math 124/125/126 are available for the 2013-2014 academic year. Both current UW students and non-matriculated students (from outside the UW) may register.
Ron Irving selected as next chair
June 2013: We are very pleased to share the news that Ron Irving will serve as the next department chair for a five-year term starting July 1, 2013.
Sam Hopkins awarded Dean's Medal for 2013
May 2013: Sam Hopkins has been awarded this year's Dean's Medal in the Natural Sciences. A double major in Math and Computer Science, Sam is also a recent recipient of an NSF Graduate Fellowship that he will use to pursue a PhD in Computer Science at Cornell. The College of Arts & Sciences presents the undergraduate Dean's Medal annually to an outstanding student in each of its four divisions. Sam is the 10th Math major in 12 years to be honored with a Dean's Medal. Congratulations to Sam and all the other outstanding Math students.
Sara Billey featured in 2013 AWM Grand Prize Winning Essay
April 2013: Rebecca Myers, the Grand Prize winner of the 2013 Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) essay contest, made Sara Billey the focus of her paper titled "Sara Billey: The Most Famous ‘Sara in Math’." Rebecca Myers is currently a junior at High Tech High International in San Diego.
Congratulations to UW Winners of NSF Postdoctoral Fellowships
April 2013: Elliot Paquette and Brent Werness have won NSF Postdoctoral Fellowships. Paquette is a fifth year graduate student, completing his PhD in the spectral theory of random matrices under the direction of Ioana Dumitriu. His NSF postdoc will be spent at the Weizmann Institute in Israel. Werness completed his PhD at the University of Chicago before joining our department in 2012. He will remain in the department as an NSF postdoc. His primary fields of interest are Schramm-Loewner Evolutions and related processes.
Jack Lee co-recipient of AMS Bergman Prize
March 2013: Jack Lee and his co-author David Jerison of MIT were jointly awarded the 2012 Stefan Bergman Prize by the American Mathematical Society "for their pioneering works on the CR Yamabe problem, which led to finding canonical metrics in a given conformal class, for strictly pseudo-convex manifolds." Additional information may be found in the Notices of the AMS.
Remembering Bob Phelps
March 2013: A celebration of the life of Bob Phelps will be held at the UW Club on Sunday, March 24th, from 2-5pm. For those who would like to say a few words in honor of Bob, an open microphone will be made available starting at 3pm. Phelps' obituary, written by long-time friend and Director of the Shoreline Historical Museum, Vicki Stiles, can be found on this page of The Seattle Times.
Math students awarded UW Freshman Medal and UW Junior Medal
January 2013: Each year the UW recognizes the top student in the previous year's freshman, junior and sophomore classes as class medalists, and the top graduating senior as the President's Medalist. David Jekel and Eric Lei were recently awarded this year's Freshman Medal and Junior Medal, respectively. David majors in Classics and Math, and Eric in CSE, Econ and Math. Additional information can be found in UW Today. With Eric's and David's awards, Math majors have won 11 (over 40%) of the UW medals awarded during the past six years. Congratulations to Eric, David and all the other outstanding Math students.
AMS Fellows Named
November 2012: The American Mathematical Society has recently launched the AMS Fellows program. Included in the inaugural class of AMS Fellows are 17 mathematicians (11 professors and 6 emeritus professors) from the UW Math Department: Sara Billey, Chris Burdzy, Ioana Dumitriu, Jerry Folland, Ramesh Gangolli, Robin Graham, Ralph Greenberg, Branko Grünbaum, Doug Lind, Ernie Michael, Steve Mitchell, Isaac Namioka, Bob Phelps, Boris Solomyak, Rekha Thomas, Gunther Uhlmann and James Zhang. Information about the AMS Fellows program and a complete list of the inaugural class may be found here.
Jim Morrow wins AWM Humphreys Award
August 2012: Jim Morrow is the recipient of the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) 2013 Gweneth Humphreys Award. The award is given annually to a mathematics professor "who has encouraged female graduate students to pursue mathematical careers and/or the study of mathematics at the graduate level." See this AWM press release for more information.
Andrew Loveless receives Distinguished Teaching Award
June 2012: Congratulations to Andrew Loveless on receiving the UW Distinguished Teaching Award. Awardees are chosen on a variety of criteria such as innovation in the learning process, ability to engage and inspire original thinking in students, and innovations in course and curriculum design. Loveless joined the department as a Lecturer after completing his PhD at WSU in 2005, and was promoted to Senior Lecturer in 2010. The award was given in a ceremony on June 7th.
Gunther Uhlmann at Eastside Science Café on July 9th
June 2012: Gunther Uhlmann will be featured in the Pacific Science Center's Eastside Science Café on July 9th, which will be titled "Cloaking: Science Meets Science Fiction." The Science Café will take place at 7pm at the Wilde Rover Irish Pub in Kirkland. Science Cafés are free and open to all ages, with no science background required. Uhlmann's work on invisibility was recently featured in this UW Today article.
Jane Hung awarded 2012 UW Junior Medal and Dean's Medal
April 2012: Jane Hung has received both the UW Junior Medal and the Dean's Medal in the Natural Sciences. The UW awards the Junior Medal to the senior having the highest scholastic standing for their first three years of coursework. (See this article for more information.) The College of Arts & Sciences presents the undergraduate Dean's Medal annually to an outstanding student in each of its four divisions. Jane is a double major in Math and Physics, and has conducted research in Chemistry since her freshman year. She plans to pursue a PhD in Chemical Engineering at MIT.
Congratulations to 2012 NSF Graduate Fellows
Dylan Wilson and Milda Zizyte April 2012: Winners of this year's recently announced National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowships include Dylan Wilson, Milda Zizyte, and Sylvester Eriksson-Bique. Dylan and Milda are both UW Math majors who will graduate this year, Milda with a double major in Math and Computer Science. Sylvester will enter the department as a graduate student this autumn.
The NSF Graduate Fellowships recognize outstanding students in science, engineering, and mathematics. More information about the fellowships and the 2012 awardees may be found here.
NSF Highlight on the Zipper Algorithm
March 2012: The NSF has published a research highlight on the work of Don Marshall and Steffen Rohde concerning the zipper algorithm. The algorithm allows accurate computation of angle-preserving mappings commonly found in science and engineering and is related to models for such complex details as the shape of DNA molecules or how water percolates through soil.
For more information, see this article at Research.gov.
Matt Kahle and Karl Schwede Receive Sloan Research Fellowships
February 2012: Matt Kahle and Karl Schwede have each been awarded a Sloan Research Fellowship by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The two-year fellowship is awarded to researchers "in recognition of distinguished performance and unique potential to make substantial contributions to their field." Matt and Karl earned their PhDs with the UW Math Department in 2007 under Eric Babson and Christopher Hoffman, and in 2006 under Sándor Kovács, respectively. See their homepages to learn more about Matt Kahle and Karl Schwede.
Matthew Badger Awarded NSF Postdoc
January 2012: Congratulations to Matthew Badger, who was recently awarded a prestigious NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship. Matthew earned his PhD at UW in 2011 under the supervision of Tatiana Toro and now studies geometric measure theory at Stony Brook University. He plans to use the fellowship to work with Chris Bishop and Raanan Schul at Stony Brook. His research will focus on questions at the interface of geometric measure theory and harmonic analysis.
UW Math Circle
January 2012: The UW Math Circle middle school outreach program, coordinated by Julia Pevtsova and supported by two grants from the NSF, has been profiled in the January edition of the College of Arts & Sciences' Perspectives. Click here to view the article.
Performances of Truth Values: December 1 - 3
The Department is pleased to present three upcoming performances of Truth Values: One Girl's Romp through M.I.T.'s Male Math Maze (click for video), an award-winning solo show written and performed by Gioia De Cari. Performances will take place at the Ethnic Cultural Center Theater on December 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. For more information and to purchase tickets, see this link.
New faculty and postdocs
Not pictured: Jonas Azzam, Chelsea Walton September 2011: The department is pleased to welcome this Autumn five new faculty and postdocs: Jonas Azzam, Acting Assistant Professor and RTG Postdoctoral Fellow (PhD, UCLA 2011), studies geometric measure theory, analysis on metric spaces, and harmonic analysis. Kenneth Chan, Acting Assistant Professor (PhD, University of New South Wales 2010) studies noncommutative algebra and algebraic geometry. Benjamin Lundell, Acting Assistant Professor (PhD, Cornell University 2011) studies number theory. Linh Vinh Tran, Acting Assistant Professor (PhD, Rutgers University 2011) studies probabilistic and additive combinatorics. Chelsea Walton, NSF Postdoctoral Fellow (PhD, University of Michigan 2011) studies noncommutative algebra and representation theory.
Survey ranks UW fifth worldwide in mathematics
June 2011: A survey conducted for the Times High Education magazine has ranked the University of Washington fifth in the world for mathematics. This ranking, based on 2001-2011 data provided by Thomson Reuters, includes the contributions of all of the UW mathematical sciences departments and of mathematically oriented faculty in other science and engineering departments. More information about the survey and its results may be found here.
Jacob Bobman awarded UW President's Medal for 2011
Jacob Bobman June 2011: Jacob Bobman has been selected as one of the two UW President's Medal winners for 2011. Jacob is a double major in Mathematics and Biochemistry. See this page for more information on this year's President's Medals.
Will Johnson awarded 2011 Dean's Medal
Will Johnson June 2011: Will Johnson is the winner of this year's Dean's Medal in the Natural Sciences. The College of Arts & Sciences presents the Dean's Medal awards annually to a single outstanding student in each of its four divisions. Will graduates this spring with degrees in Mathematics and Computer Science. He will pursue a PhD in Mathematics at UC Berkeley.
2011 Math Department undergraduate awards
June 2011: Outstanding undergraduate Mathematics and ACMS majors were honored with awards given at this year's Honors Luncheon on June 2nd. Each student was given a book reflecting their mathematical interests, along with a reward stipend. A full list of this year's awardees and their chosen books may be found here.
Gunther Uhlmann awarded the 2011 Kleinman Prize
Gunther Uhlmann April 2011: The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) has awarded Gunther Uhlmann the 2011 Kleinman Prize, which is given for "outstanding research, or other contributions, that bridge the gap between mathematics and applications." The award ceremony will take place at the ICIAM in Vancouver in July. See the SIAM website for more information and a list of previous recipients.
Congratulations to 2011 NSF Graduate Fellows
Richard Robinson, Cris Negron, and Will Johnson. (Tia Lerud not pictured.) April 2011: Winners of the recently announced 2011 National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowships, which recognize outstanding graduate students in science, engineering, and mathematics, include Cris Negron, Richard Robinson, Will Johnson and Tia Lerud. Cris and Richard are current Mathematics PhD students, Will will graduate this year with a double major in Math and Computer Science, and Tia graduated last autumn with a double major in ACMS and Statistics. More information about the fellowships and the 2011 awardees may be found here.
Math majors receive Goldwater Scholarships
Jane Hung and Mark Bun April 2011: Mathematics majors Mark Bun and Jane Hung have been awarded Goldwater Scholarships, given annually to foster and encourage excellence in science, mathematics, and engineering. Mark and Jane are both double majors; Mark is also a Computer Science major, and Jane is also a Physics major. More information about this prestigious scholarship and the nationwide list of 2011 awardees can be found here.
Krzysztof Burdzy to serve as editor of Annals of Probability
Krzysztof Burdzy March 2011: Krzysztof Burdzy has been selected to serve as the editor of Annals of Probability, one of the two leading journals in the field. Burdzy's term as editor, which begins in January 2012, will last three years.
Gunther Uhlmann to deliver Einstein Lecture
Gunther Uhlmann February 2011: Gunther Uhlmann has been selected to present the 6th annual American Mathematical Society Einstein Public Lecture in Mathematics on March 17, 2012. "The lectures began in 2005, to celebrate the one-hundredth anniversary of Einstein's annus mirabilis. The year 1905 marked the publication by Albert Einstein in Germany of three fundamental papers that changed the course of twentieth-century physics." For further information from the AMS, including a list of previous Einstein lecturers, see the AMS website.
Max Lieblich receives NSF CAREER grant
Max Lieblich January 2011: The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a CAREER grant to Max Lieblich. The NSF awards these prestigious grants to "junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations." Lieblich will use the grant to fund mathematics outreach in the Pacific Northwest, a conference for new PhDs, and research done by himself and graduate students on the Brauer group in formal and algebraic geometry.
Gracie Ingermanson awarded UW Sophomore Medal
Gracie Ingermanson January 2011: Mathematics major Gracie Ingermanson has been awarded the UW Sophomore Medal. The University of Washington awards this medal to the outstanding junior based on his or her academic record for the previous academic year. See here for more information on Gracie and the other medalists.
Gunther Uhlmann receives AMS Bôcher Prize
Gunther Uhlmann January 2011: Gunther Uhlmann was awarded the Bôcher Prize by the American Mathematical Society "for his fundamental work on inverse problems and in particular for the solution to the Calderón problem in the papers 'The Calderón problem with partial data' (with Carlos E. Kenig and Johannes Sjöstrand, Annals of Math. (2) 165 (2007) no. 2, 567-591) and 'The Calderón problem with partial data in two dimensions' (with Oleg Yu. Imanuvilov and Masahiro Yamamoto, J. Amer Math. Soc. 23 (2010), no. 3, 655-691). The prize also recognizes Uhlmann's incisive work on boundary rigidity with L. Pestov and with P. Stefanov and on nonuniqueness (also known as cloaking) with A. Greenleaf, Y. Kurylev, and M. Lassas."
Nate Bottman awarded 2010 Dean's Medal and NSF Graduate Fellowship
Nate Bottman May 2010: Nate Bottman, who will graduate next month with undergraduate degrees in both Mathematics and Russian, has added two more honors to his list of accolades. From within the UW, Nate was awarded the 2010 Dean's Medal from the College of Arts & Sciences. Nate is the seventh Mathematics major since 2002 to achieve this distinction. From outside the UW, Nate receives a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship, which he will use to pursue a PhD in Mathematics at M.I.T.
Genia Vogman awarded Department of Energy Graduate Fellowship
Genia Vogman May 2010: Congratulations to Genia Vogman, the recipient of a prestigious Department of Energy Graduate Fellowship. Genia will use the fellowship to pursue a PhD at the University of California, Berkeley.
2010 Math Department Undergraduate Awards
May 2010: Outstanding undergraduate Mathematics and ACMS majors were honored with awards given at the annual Honors Luncheon on May 27th. In addition to an award stipend, each student was given a book reflecting their mathematical interests. A full list of this year's awardees and their accompanying books may be found here.
UW student team Outstanding Winner in Mathematical Contest in Modeling
April 2010: A team of UW undergraduates has been declared Outstanding Winner in the 2010 MCM, putting them in the top nine out of 2,254 participating teams. The team consists of Mark Bun, Jerry Li, and Ian Zemke. Mark is a double major in Mathematics and Computer Science, Jerry is in the Early Entrance Program, and Ian is a Mathematics major. They are the eighth team from the UW to win this distinction in nine years. As in previous years, Jim Morrow was the faculty advisor. See here for complete MCM results, and this University Week article.
Mathematics faculty honored
April 2010: Congratulations to Gunther Uhlmann on his election as SIAM Fellow, and to Neal Koblitz on being awarded an honorary doctorate by the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology.
Will Johnson earns Putnam Fellowship
March 2010: Will Johnson has earned a Putnam Fellowship after placing in the top five among 4,036 participants in the William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition. No other UW student has achieved this honor since the competition's inception in 1938. Will is a double major in Mathematics and Computer Science. In addition to Will, four UW students, Nate Bottman, Steven Rutherford, Song Yisong, Keyun Tong, placed in the top 500 in the competition. For more information, see this link, the articles in University Week, Seattle Times and The Daily, and the editorial in the Seattle Times.
In honor of Paul Tseng
February 2010: Our colleague, Professor Paul Tseng, went missing on a kayaking trip on August 13, 2009. Conferences are being planned in his honor, to take place both in Seattle and Shanghai. See this page for more information.
Sloan Research Fellowship awarded to Max Lieblich
February 2010: Max Lieblich has been awarded a Sloan Research Fellowship. The fellowship, awarded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, seeks to "stimulate fundamental research by early-career scientists and scholars of outstanding promise." For more information, see this article in University Week.
NSF Postdoctoral Fellowships
February 2010: Jim Gill and Catherine Williams have been awarded NSF Postdoctoral Fellowships. Gill, who joined the department upon completing his PhD at Washington University in St. Louis in 2009, plans to use the fellowship to continue his work here for another three years. Williams completed her PhD in our department in 2008 under the supervision of Dan Pollack. She has since been at Stanford as a Samelson Fellow, and plans to use her NSF Postdoc at Columbia.
Julia Pevtsova awarded NSF CAREER grant
January 2010: Julia Pevtsova has received a CAREER grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The NSF awards these prestigious grants to "junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations." Some of the ways Pevtsova will use the CAREER grant include developing new connections between representation theory and algebraic geometry, advancing understanding of geometric and homological properties of representations of algebras, and expanding her outreach efforts.
Mark Bun and Will Johnson awarded UW Sophomore and Junior Medals
January 2010: Mark Bun and Will Johnson have been awarded the UW's Sophomore and Junior Medals. The University of Washington awards these medals to the junior and senior having the highest scholastic standing for the first two and three years of coursework, respectively. Mark is a double major in Mathematics and Computer Science. Will, already a Computer Science major, recently declared as a Mathematics major as well. Mark, Will, and the Freshman Medalist each credit Mathematics faculty as significant influences. Read more in this University Week article.
Finding solutions to thousand year old problem
November 2009: Graduate student Robert Bradshaw is part of an international group of mathematicians who have resolved the first one trillion cases of a thousand year old mathematics problem: Which whole numbers can be the area of a right-angled triangle whose sides are whole numbers or fractions? See the Unversity Week article and American Institute of Mathematics press release for further details.
Ralph Greenberg and Tatiana Toro invited speakers at ICM 2010
October 2009: UW Math faculty members Ralph Greenberg and Tatiana Toro have been invited to speak at the International Congress of Mathematicians to be held in Hyderabad in August 2010. A full list of the invited plenary and sectional speakers is available here.
Ioana Dumitriu awarded NSF CAREER grant
June 2009: Ioana Dumitriu has received a CAREER grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The NSF awards these prestigious grants to "junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations."
2009 Math Department Undergraduate Awards
June 2009: Outstanding undergraduate Mathematics and ACMS majors were honored with awards given at the annual Honors Luncheon on May 28th. In addition to an award stipend, each student was given a book reflecting their mathematical interests. A full list of this year's awardees and their accompanying books may be found here.
Department receives Research Training Grant from NSF
May 2009: The Department has been awarded a Research Training Grant in Partial Differential Equations/Inverse Problems by the National Science Foundation. The award will, in particular, support the training of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Gunther Uhlmann, Robin Graham, Jim Morrow, Hart Smith and Tatiana Toro are the Principal Investigators of the RTG.
Neal Koblitz wins prize for Excellence
April 2009: Neal Koblitz was awarded a 2009 prize for Excellence in the Field of Mathematics by an international group of security experts for his work in cryptography. The award was given at the 2009 RSA Conference in San Diego. See this University Week article for more information about Koblitz's work.
Gunther Uhlmann named Fellow of American Academy of Arts & Sciences
April 2009: Gunther Uhlmann was elected Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences alongside 210 other leaders in the sciences, humanities, arts, business and public affairs. Uhlmann works on inverse problems--problems in which one attempts to determine the internal parameters of a medium by making measurements at the boundary or at the exterior of the medium. Another recent area of interest has been cloaking, which deals with the question of how to make objects invisible to electromagnetic waves, sound waves and other types of waves; an overview of this work can be found at the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics website.
Undergraduates excel in Putnam mathematical competition
April 2009: UW undergraduate students' performance in last Autumn's William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition are the best in recent memory, with students competing in both team and individual competitions. Out of 405 participating teams from the United States and Canada, the UW's team, which consisted of Nate Bottman, William Johnson, and Igor Tolkov, scored 15th. Eight UW students participated in the individual competition, with the top scores three going to William Johnson (who placed 6th among 3,627 participants), Nate Bottman, and Keyun Tong. Assistant Professors Ioana Dumitriu and Julia Pevtsova coached the teams.

Further information can be found in this article in University Week and the Putnam website.
From left to right: Ioana Dumitriu (coach), Michael Rutherford, Igor Tolkov, William Johnson, Nate Bottman, Julia Pevtsova (coach), and Ben Heyes. Photo by Kathy Sauber.
Math 381 students help community partners solve problems
March 2009: How do you optimize production and maximize profits with limited space, while providing as many work hours as possible to employees? That was the challenge presented to a group of students in Math 381: Discrete Mathematical Modeling, a class offered by the UW Department of Mathematics. The students learned how to use mathematical modeling to solve real-world problems.

Read the full College of Arts & Sciences story here.
Chad Klumb awarded UW Sophomore Medal
February 2009: Mathematics major Chad Klumb has been awarded the UW's Sophomore Medal. Chad is now a two-time UW medalist, having won the Freshman Medal last year. The University of Washington awards the Freshman Medal to the sophomore having the highest scholastic standing for the first year of his or her course, and the Sophomore Medal to the junior having the highest scholastic standing for the first two years of his or her course.
Jeff Eaton awarded Dean's Medal for 2008
June 2008: The College of Arts & Sciences has named Jeff Eaton a Dean's Medalist for 2008. Jeff joins Kathy Temple (1999), Thomas Carlson (2002), Jeff Giansiracusa (2003), Terri Moore (2004), Eliana Hechter (2006), and Nick Reichert (2007) in a distinguished line of seven Mathematics majors who have received the Dean's Medal in the last ten years. Jeff will graduate from UW with Bachelor's Degrees in both Mathematics and Sociology, a Master's Degree in Statistics, and a minor in Music. After graduation he plans to pursue a PhD at Imperial College London as a Marshall Scholar.
2008 Mathematics Honors Luncheon
May 2008: The annual Mathematics Honors Luncheon was held at the UW Club on May 20th to recognize outstanding undergraduate Mathematics and ACMS majors. In addition to their award, each student was given a book reflecting their mathematical interests. A full list of this year's awardees and their accompanying books may be found here.
Mathematics students honored as UW medalists
April 2008: Mathematics students Chad Klumb and Ting-You Wang have been awarded the UW's Freshman Medal and Junior Medal respectively. These medals are awarded to students who have had the strongest academic record in their class for the previous year. For further details, see this article in University Week.
Nate Bottman wins Goldwater Scholarship
April 2008: Nate Bottman has been awarded a 2008 Goldwater Scholarship. This is but the latest in a series of honors Nate has earned. Information about the scholarship and a list of the 2008 scholars may be found here.
Ginger Warfield wins 2008 PIMS Education Prize
April 2008: Ginger Warfield has been awarded the 2008 PIMS Education Prize. This award is given yearly to a member of the PIMS community who has made a significant contribution to education in the mathematical sciences. Further information about PIMS and the Education Prize may be found here.
Chris Hoffman awarded AMS Centennial Fellowship
March 2008: Chris Hoffman was awarded an American Mathematical Society Centennial Fellowship. The primary selection criterion for the fellowship is the excellence of the candidate's research. For more information and a list of past awardees, see this link.
Jim Morrow receives 2008 Haimo Award from MAA
January 2008: Jim Morrow has received the 2008 Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo Award for Distinguished College or University Teaching of Mathematics from the Mathematical Association of America. Click here to read the award citation and Morrow's response.
Click here for a University Week profile of Jim Morrow.
SAGE wins prize in international software competition
December 2007: The open source software SAGE, based in our department and led by William Stein, has won first prize in the scientific software category of the 2007 Trophées du Libre. Further information can be found in an article by David Joyner and William Stein on the significance of open source software for mathematics, a UW news release, and the UW Daily article.
Jeff Eaton awarded Marshall Scholarship
November 2007: Jeff Eaton has been awarded a Marshall Scholarship to pursue a PhD in Infectious Disease Epidemiology at Imperial College in London. For his PhD he plans to develop mathematical models to understand the spread of infectious disease epidemics such as the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa.
Jeff entered the UW through the Academy for Young Scholars at age 16. His freshman year he was named the outstanding student in the Math 134/5/6 Honors Calculus course. He has participated in the Department's summer REU program, participated twice in the Mathematical Modeling Contest, and has been a facilitator the Math Fair program the Department runs at local elementary schools. He was a Gates Fellow during 2006-07, and spent the academic year working at a Demographic Surveillance Site in South Africa. Jeff plans to graduate in June 2008 with Bachelor's Degrees in Mathematics and Sociology, a Master's Degree in Statistics, and a minor in Music. See the UW Daily article for further information.
Nate Bottman adds Davidson Fellowship to his awards
August 2007: Nate Bottman has been named a Davidson Fellow. Other awards received by Nate during the past year include the UW Freshman Medal, an Outstanding Winner designation at the 2007 Mathematical Contest in Modeling as a member of a UW team, and a Math in Moscow Award from the American Mathematical Society. Here's a recent Seattle Post-Intelligencer article about Nate.
Zhenqing Chen elected Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics
August 2007: Zhenqing Chen was named Fellow of the IMS in recognition of his research on the Dirichlet form approach to Markov processes, reflected Brownian motion and stable processes. See the IMS press release for additional information.
Victor Klee (1925 - 2007)
August 2007: Vic Klee passed away on August 17, 2007 in Lakewood, Ohio. Klee was a distinguished member of our department for nearly 54 years. He will be sorely missed.
See this page for more information.
Ioana Dumitriu wins Leslie Fox Prize
June 2007: Ioana Dumitriu has won the 2007 Leslie Fox Prize in Numerical Analysis.  Information on this biennial competition, the prize and past winners may be found here.
Nick Reichert awarded Dean's Medal in the Natural Sciences for 2007
May 2007: The College of Arts & Sciences has named Nick Reichert the Dean's Medalist in the Natural Sciences for 2007. Nick joins Kathy Temple (1999), Thomas Carlson (2002), Jeff Giansiracusa (2003), Terri Moore (2004) and Eliana Hechter (2006) in a distinguished line of six Mathematics majors who have received the Dean's Medal in the last nine years. After graduating from UW with simultaneous Bachelor's and Master's degrees, Nick will attend the mathematics PhD program at Princeton University.
With two wins in 2007, UW Math has seven MCM wins in six years
March 2007: Two teams of UW undergraduates were declared Outstanding Winners in this year's Mathematical Contest in Modeling. The team of Sam Burden, Aaron Dilley, and Lukas Svec were Outstanding Winners, and also won the MAA Award. The team of Nate Bottman, Wes Essig, and Sam Whittle were Outstanding Winners. Of the 949 teams that participated in the MCM this year, 14 were designated Outstanding Winners. We have had seven Outstanding Winners in the last six years. Having been inspired by the standard set by Lance Armstrong in the Tour de France, do we now dare to turn to John Wooden's record? This year's results are available at 2007 MCM Results.
Click here for a related article in University Week.
Gunther Uhlmann's work on invisibility cloaking
January 2007: Every child's dream of becoming invisible leaped forward last year toward becoming a reality. A cloaking device has set the mathematical community buzzing about how to make invisibility not just possible, but practical. Invisibility cloaking and the contributions of Gunther Uhlmann to the mathematics of this area are the subject of an article in University Week.
Ginger Warfield receives Louise Hay Award
January 2007: Ginger Warfield has been awarded the 2007 Louise Hay Award. This award, given by the Association for Women in Mathematics, recognizes outstanding achievement in mathematics education. University Week has published a profile of Warfield in recognition of this award and her many contributions to education in mathematics.  Please see this page for the citation of the award and Warfield's response.
Eliana Hechter awarded the Dean's Medal in the Natural Sciences
May 2006: The College of Arts & Sciences has named Eliana Hechter the Dean's Medalist in the Natural Sciences for 2006. This marks the third time in four years that this honor has been awarded to a Mathematics major. Also a recipient of the Rhodes Scholarship (see below), Eliana will continue on to pursue a PhD at the University of Oxford.
Nick Reichert awarded Astronaut Scholarship
May 2006: Mathematics undergraduate Nick Reichert has been awarded an Astronaut Scholarship. The Astronaut Scholarship Foundation, established by the Mercury 7 astronauts, annually awards a fellowship to a student in each of 18 universities, including the University of Washington. Each institution selects two nominees in a university-wide competition, and the Foundation makes the final selection. Increasing Nick's honor is the fact that the Scholarship is seldom awarded to an undergraduate, nor to a student whose department name does not include the prefix "astro!"
Jim Morrow to receive Distinguished Teaching Award
May 2006: Professor Jim Morrow has been selected to receive the Distinguished Teaching Award of the Pacific Northwest section of the Mathematical Association of America. This adds to the list of awards that Professor Morrow has earned for educational excellence, including the Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences Education Prize in 2005 and the University of Washington Distinguished Teaching Award in 2003.
Biesel, Eaton awarded Goldwater Scholarship
March 2006: Owen Biesel and Jeff Eaton have both received the 2006 Goldwater Scholarship.  Owen, majoring in Mathematics and Physics, and Jeff, majoring in Mathematics, Statistics, and Sociology, along with former recipients Anna Schneider (2005), Noah Giansiracusa (2004), and Eliana Hechter (2004) comprise the five Mathematics students currently at the UW to earn this prestigious scholarship.
Eliana Hechter awarded Rhodes Scholarship
November 2005:Mathematics major Eliana Hechter has been awarded a Rhodes Scholarship for graduate study at the University of Oxford. Eliana plans to pursue a PhD (or DPhil in Oxford-speak) in mathematics at Oxford.
Eliana entered the University of Washington at the age of 14 through the Early Entrance Program. She took the accelerated honors sequences Math 134/5/6 and Math 334/5/6 in her first and third year at UW. She is taking the year-long graduate level courses in algebra and real analysis during her senior year. She participated in the department's Research Experiences for Undergradutes program last summer, supported by a Phelps Fellowship. She is currently doing research on the dynamics of cell division, and working on her senior thesis in homological algebra with John Palmieri. Eliana received a Goldwater Scholarship in 2004; just a week ago she was selected for a Marshall Scholarship, which she will decline in favor of the Rhodes Scholarship. Click here for a recent Associated Press article about Eliana Hechter and her achievements.
Article by President Emmert: We Did the Math
September 2005: The Department of Mathematics is the subject of the lead article by UW President Mark Emmert in the September issue of Columns, the University of Washington Alumni Magazine. Click here to read the article: We Did the Math.
Jim Morrow receives two new awards: PIMS Education Prize, and College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professorship
May 2005: Jim Morrow has been awarded a College of Arts and Sciences Alumni Distinguished Professorship for the 2005-06 academic year.
Morrow has also received the Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences (PIMS) Education Prize, the goal of which is to recognize those who have "played a major role in encouraging activities which enhance public awareness and appreciation of mathematics, as well as fostering communication amongst the various groups and organizations concerned."
Math Department challenges Lance: Fifth MCM win in four years
March 2005: A team of undergraduates has continued our streak in the Mathematical Contest in Modeling. The team of Ryan Bressler, Braxton Osting and Christina Polwarth were designated Outstanding Winners in the 2005 contest and also received the INFORMS Award. We now have five Outstanding Winners in the last four years in a bold challenge to the standard set by Lance Armstrong on the Tour de France. The results are available at 2005 MCM Results.
Math Department wins 2005 Brotman Award
March 2005: The Department of Mathematics has been selected to receive the 2005 Brotman Award for Instructional Excellence. The Brotman Award is the University's undergraduate teaching excellence award for departments and other instructional units. The Math Department has been praised for a range of accomplishments including its reform of precalculus and calculus instruction, the introduction of the ACMS major in collaboration with the other mathematical science departments, the reform and expansion of the Mathematics undergraduate degree program, as well as the successes the students in these programs. General information about the Brotman Award may be found here.
Branko Grünbaum Awarded Steele Prize by AMS
January 2005: Branko Grünbaum was awarded the 2005 AMS Leroy P. Steele Prize for Mathematical Exposition. Presented annually by the American Mathematical Society, the Steele Prize is one of the highest distinctions in mathematics.

Grünbaum was honored for his book, Convex Polytopes. The prize citation states: "[This book] has served both as a standard reference and as an inspiration for three and a half decades of research in the theory of polytopes. That theory is currently very active and enjoys connections with many other areas of mathematics, including optimization, computational algebra, algebraic geometry, and representation theory. Much of the development that led to the present, thriving state of polytope theory owes its existence to this book, which served as a source of information for workers in the field and as a source of inspiration for them to enter the field. Despite the passage of time, Convex Polytopes retains its value both as an exposition of the theory and as a reference work. Springer-Verlag's decision to issue a second edition in 2003, consisting of Grünbaum's original text plus notes by Volker Kaibel, Victor Klee, and Guenter Ziegler to describe newer developments, will extend the book's influence to future generations of mathematicians."
UW awarded VIGRE Grant
April 2004: UW Departments of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and Statistics are to be awarded a second five-year VIGRE grant by the National Science Foundation in order to expand the work we have been doing under a current VIGRE grant. The grant will fund undergraduate research, graduate fellowships and postdoctoral fellowships to facilitate vertical integration, integration across departments, as well as increased cooperation with the Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences (PIMS).
Top of page
 

U of W Website Terms & Conditions    |    PRINTER FRIENDLY FORMAT   |   U of W Online Privacy Statement
Please send comments, corrections, and suggestions to: webmaster[at]math.washington.edu
Last modified: December 9, 2016, 12:31

Bookmark and Share