The Department of Mathematics at the University of Washington is one of the major research mathematics departments in the United States. It has an excellent research reputation, a strong, demanding program of graduate study in mathematics, and a full range of excellent undergraduate course offerings. The department has approximately 60 faculty with research interests in virtually every area of mathematics. The department has about 100 full-time students in the graduate program and over 800 undergraduate majors, including 600 in the Mathematics undergraduate program and 200 in the joint ACMS program.

Recent Department News

Thomas Rothvoss receives Sloan Research Fellowship
February 2015: On February 23rd, the Sloan Foundation announced the winners of its 2015 Sloan Research Fellows in a full-page ad in the New York Times. Among the recipients is Thomas Rothvoss, who joined the department in January 2014 as an assistant professor. Thomnas works in discrete optimization, linear/integer programming, and theoretical computer science. As of January 2015, he holds a joint appointment as an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering.
Albert Nijenhuis (1926-2015)
February 2015: Affiliate faculty member Albert Nijenhuis died on Friday, February 13. He was born on November 21, 1926, in Eindhoven, The Netherlands. During World War II, he studied mathematics on his own, continuing his studies afterwards at the University of Amsterdam and receiving his PhD in 1952. Following appointments at Princeton, the Institute for Advanced Study, and the University of Chicago, Albert came to the University of Washington as an assistant professor, staying until 1963, by which time he was a professor. During his years on the faculty, Albert spoke at the International Congress of Mathematicians (1958, Edinburgh) and was a Guggenheim Fellow. In 1963, he moved to the University of Pennsylvania. Upon retirement in 1987, Albert returned to his beloved Seattle and became an affiliate professor in the department, where we were fortunate to benefit from his warm presence for many years.
Alumnus Brian Hopkins receives 2015 Haimo Teaching Award
January 2015: At the Joint Mathematical Meetings in San Antonio earlier this month, Brian Hopkins received the Mathematical Association of America's Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo Award for Distinguished College or University Teaching of Mathematics, the same award that Jim Morrow was given in 2008. Hopkins, a professor at St. Peter's University in Jersey City, New Jersey, obtained his PhD at UW in 1997 under the supervision of Monty McGovern. In the award citation, Brian is described as "a master teacher with a genuine desire to see all of his students succeed, with a knack for posing problems and the ability to create an atmosphere of mutual respect and exploration in his classroom." In responding, Brian listed among his inspirations "John Sullivan (appreciation of historical sources), Virginia Warfield (teaching informed by education research), and James King (well-used technology)." This is Brian's second MAA award. In 2005, he and co-author Robin Wilson shared the George Pólya Award for articles of expository excellence for their paper on Euler's Konigsberg bridge problem.
Matt Junge teaching in women's prison
January 2015: Matt Junge, a graduate student who received the department's Excellence in Teaching award in 2011, is featured in the current newsletter of the Freedom Education Project Puget Sound for a year-long college prep course he is offering at the Washington Correction Center for Women. With the resumption of his class earlier this month, one student declared, "The break was way too long. Can we start the semester earlier next time?" Matt, who studied math and philosophy as an undergraduate at UW, is serving the department this year as Lead TA while continuing his research in probability.

Archived News


 

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Last modified: February 23, 2015, 09:53

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